FAQs

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Gerenal FAQs

What causes tooth decay?

Decay is caused by bacteria that collect on teeth and feed on the carbohydrates in our diet. The bacteria produce acid that wears away at the enamel on our teeth. If decay is left untreated, it can cause pain, infection and even tooth loss. Protect your teeth against decay by brushing at least twice a day, flossing daily, visiting your dentist regularly.

What is dry mouth and what can I do about it?

Dry mouth is caused by a reduced flow of saliva. Saliva is needed to help control bacteria and wash away food debris. Certain medications, some diseases, smoking and chewing tobacco can cause dry mouth. If you suffer from dry mouth, call us and we can recommend ways to treat it.

How often should I change my toothbrush?

Every 3 months or sooner if the bristles become worn and frayed. If you’ve been sick with a cold or other bacterial infection, it’s wise to replace your toothbrush once you’re better.

How often should I see a dentist?

Once every 6 months is good for most people, but some people with special conditions may need to see their dentist more often. Schedule an appointment to find out what’s best for you.

Why should I go to the dentist regularly?

Many people do not see a dentist on a regular basis. They only go when they have a problem. This is known as "crisis treatment" versus "preventive treatment." While these patients may feel they are saving money, it often ends up costing much more in dollars and time. This is because many dental problems do not have symptoms until they reach the advanced stages of the disease process. An example is tooth decay. It is typical to hear, "Nothing hurts... I don't have any problems."

How can I get my kids to brush their teeth?

Make it fun! If you are enthusiastic about brushing your teeth, your children will also be enthusiastic. Children want to do the things their parents do. If your children see you brushing your teeth and displaying good dental habits, they will follow. Ask the dentist for other creative ways to get children to brush their teeth

What are the dangers of oral piercings?

The American Dental Association recognizes that piercing is a widely accepted form of self-expression, and that includes piercings in the mouth. However, the potential problems from piercings are numerous. Some symptoms after a piercing include pain, swelling, infection, drooling, taste loss, scarring, chipped teeth, tooth loss, and an increased flow of saliva, none of which are particularly pleasant. Tongue piercing can also cause excessive bleeding. If you're thinking of placing a piercing in or around your mouth, talk to your dentist first. If you already have piercings and are having problems, see your dentist right away.